Acne Scar Treatment – Dermabrasion

If you find that microdermabrasion isn’t adequately affecting your acne scars, you might be interested in learning more about its related procedure, dermabrasion. It’s a stronger version of microdermabrasion, is considered by many to be one of the more effective course of treatment for acne scarring.

So what is a dermabrasion procedure, and does it work for reducing acne scarring? Let’s have a look at these questions in this article right now.

What happens with dermabrasion?

For this procedure, you are under the affects of a topical localized anesthetic and a high-speed brush is used to remove the surface of the skin. Dermabrasion as a scar treatment can be performed in your doctor’s office or as an outpatient facility.

This procedure removes the surface layer of cells and stimulates the underlying skin to renew itself. This procedure is generally more involved than microdermabrasion, and requires a much more lengthy recovery period of 7 to 14 days.

You are also advised to avoid sunlight either direct or indirect for 6 months following the procedure and to always use sunscreen generously while outdoors after this period of time. So be aware of this, otherwise you may end up with sunburn and premature skin aging this way.

What are the side effects of this procedure?

There are several possible side effects with this procedure that you should be aware of.

First, is the risk of changes in skin pigmentation leading to uneven skin tone. This can be permanent rather than just temporary, so it’s worth mentioning.

Second, the formation of scars from the procedure is also possible. This will negate the effects it will have on the old scars, and depends on your skin’s tendency to scar when overly stimulated.

Thirdly, skin infection is another risk of the procedure which sometimes occurs. This is treated with antibiotics and should be treated early to result in a faster recovery from this complication.

And finally, the lengthy recovery time is the most common side effect of this procedure, and makes dermabrasion more inconvenient that it’s milder version.

Some people who decide for this kind of treatment opt for microdermabrasion, its more gentle alternative, first. If this milder form achieves what your skin needs, there is no reason to put yourself through the rigors of an unnecessary and riskier procedure.

On the other hand, if microdermabrasion isn’t enough to achieve the results you desire, it makes sense to at least consider the alternative and weight the risks involved with it.

In conclusion, with any acne procedure to treat scars, there are pros and cons. Choose the course of treatment that fits most closely with your expected results, the amount of time you’re willing to take off for recovery, and how effective your physician feels the treatment will be for your needs.

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